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Feasibility, Acceptability and Preliminary Efficacy of A Computer-Tailored Intervention to Promote HPV Vaccination in Uninsured and Underinsured Families

HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S.; the infection rate is as high as 50% in sexually active individuals under age of 25, highlighting the significance of this health problem. Healthy People 2020 targets 80% HPV vaccination rate for youth by age 15. However, the national HPV vaccination rate for youth 13-17 years was 39.7% for females and 21.6% for males, significantly below the targeted 80% goal. The HPV vaccination rate in Arizona is even lower than the national statistics (35.8 % for females, 16.7% for males), suggesting an urgent need to promote HPV vaccination in Arizona. Because parental consent is required for children under age 18 to receive HPV vaccination in Arizona, parents’ decision making about vaccinating their adolescent children is the key for promoting HPV vaccination. Due to competing demands and time limitations, health care providers often find providing education promoting HPV vaccination in clinical settings challenging. Computer-tailored education presents an innovative and feasible approach to address this gap. Accordingly, we have developed a bilingual (English/Spanish), computer-tailored intervention to promote HPV vaccination in clinical settings. The aims of this pilot study are to: (1) examine the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention; (2) investigate the preliminary efficacy of the intervention on parental intention to vaccinate their children, and intake of the 1st HPV vaccine. We will recruit 36 adult parents who have at least one eligible child to participate in the computer-tailored intervention and interview two healthcare providers in the clinics for their opinions about integrating the intervention into daily clinic routine. We collaborate with the Maricopa County Department of Public Health to deliver the study in three vaccine clinics serving uninsured and underinsured population. This study addresses a highly significant public health problem, HPV-associated cancers in the United States. It is innovative because it uses a novel medium and it targets Latino adolescent boys and girls to maximize the benefit of HPV vaccines and prevention efforts. If the findings of this study are promising, it could prevent cancer-related morbidity and mortality, reduce economic and social costs related to HPV-associated diseases, and reduce health disparities in HPV-associated cancers in this vulnerable population.

Project Details


Angela Chen
Principal Investigator

CONHI Faculty
Felipe Castro
Michael Todd
Research Area(s)
Infectious Disease
Population Health
Underserved Populations
Sponsor
Arizona State University ISSR

Funding Duration
2016 to 2017